Deep Sky

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Deep Sky cover art
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IMAX

NOW PLAYING—A journey 13 billion years in the making—told through the lens of NASA's James Webb Space Telescope.

Deep Sky brings the awe-inspiring images captured by NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) to IMAX® — taking audiences on a journey to the beginning of time and space, to never-before-seen cosmic landscapes and to recently discovered exoplanets, planets around other stars. 

Directed by Oscar®-nominated filmmaker Nathaniel Kahn and narrated by Oscar®-nominated actress Michelle Williams, Deep Sky follows the high-stakes global mission to build JWST and to launch it into orbit one million miles from Earth, in an attempt to answer questions that have haunted us since the beginning of time: Where did we come from? How did the universe begin? Are we alone? Deep Sky reveals the universe as we have never seen it before; immersing audiences in the stunning pictures beamed back to earth by NASA's new telescope — and capturing its vast beauty at a scale that can only be experienced on our 7-story IMAX® screen. Runtime: 40 mins.

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SHOWTIMES NOW - MARCH 24

Weekdays
1:30 p.m. 
3:30 p.m. 

Weekends 
12:30 p.m. 
2:30 p.m. 

SHOWTIMES MARCH 25 - MARCH 29

Daily
12:30 p.m.
2:30 p.m.

SHOWTIMES MARCH 30 - APRIL 26

Weekdays
1:30 p.m. 
3:30 p.m. 

Weekends 
12:30 p.m. 
2:30 p.m. 

Deep Sky Trailer
NASA's James Webb Space Telescope in space
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IMAX

Images Captured by the James Webb Space Telescope

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SMACS 0723 - James Webb Space Telescope captures a cluster of galaxies
Image attribution
NASA, ESA, CSA, and STScI

The first image shared from NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (known as Webb's First Deep Field) shows galaxy cluster SMACS 0723 overflowing with detail. This was the deepest and sharpest infrared image of the distant universe to date. This slice of the vast universe covers a patch of sky approximately the size of a grain of sand held at arm’s length by someone on the ground.

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James Webb Space Telescope anniversary photo
Image attribution
NASA, ESA, CSA, STScI, Klaus Pontoppidan (STScI)

The first anniversary image from NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) displays star birth like never seen before, full of detailed, impressionistic texture. The subject is the Rho Ophiuchi cloud complex, the closest star-forming region to Earth. It is a relatively small, quiet stellar nursery, but you'd never know it from JWST's chaotic close-up. Jets bursting from young stars crisscross the image, impacting the surrounding interstellar gas and lighting up molecular hydrogen, shown in red. Some stars display the telltale shadow of a circumstellar disk, the makings of future planetary systems.

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The Southern Ring nebula captured by the James Webb Space Telescope.
Image attribution
NASA, ESA, CSA, and STScI

NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) revealed details of the Southern Ring planetary nebula that were previously hidden from astronomers. Planetary nebulae are the shells of gas and dust ejected from dying stars. JWST's powerful infrared view brings this nebula's second star into full view, along with exceptional structures created as the stars shape the gas and dust around them.

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Pillars of Creation captured by the James Webb Space Telescope
Image attribution
NASA, ESA, CSA, STScI; Joseph DePasquale (STScI), Anton M. Koekemoer (STScI), Alyssa Pagan (STScI)

The Pillars of Creation are set off in a kaleidoscope of color in NASA's James Webb Space Telescope’s near-infrared-light view. The pillars look like arches and spires rising out of a desert landscape, but are filled with semi-transparent gas and dust, and ever changing. This is a region where young stars are forming – or have barely burst from their dusty cocoons as they continue to form.

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Stephan's Quintet captured by the James Webb Space Telescope
Image attribution
NASA, ESA, CSA, and STScI

NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) revealed Stephan's Quintet in a new light. This enormous mosaic contains over 150 million pixels and is constructed from almost 1,000 separate image files. The information from JWST provides new insights into how galactic interactions may have driven galaxy evolution in the early universe.

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Carina Nebula captured by the James Webb Space Telescope
Image attribution
NASA, ESA, CSA, and STScI

Called the Cosmic Cliffs, this landscape of "mountains" and "valleys" speckled with glittering stars is actually the edge of a nearby, young, star-forming region called NGC 3324 in the Carina Nebula. Captured in infrared light by NASA's James Webb Space Telescope, this image reveals for the first time previously invisible areas of star birth. The tallest "peaks" in this image are about 7 light-years high. 

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Neptune's rings captured by the James Webb Space Telescope
Image attribution
NASA, ESA, CSA, STScI

NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) shows off its capabilities closer to home with its image of Neptune. Not only has JWST captured the clearest view of this distant planet’s rings in more than 30 years, but its cameras reveal the ice giant in a whole new light. Most striking in JWST's new image is the crisp view of the planet's rings – some of which have not been detected since NASA's Voyager 2 became the first spacecraft to observe Neptune during its flyby in 1989. 

Image
SMACS 0723 - James Webb Space Telescope captures a cluster of galaxies
Image attribution
NASA, ESA, CSA, and STScI

The first image shared from NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (known as Webb's First Deep Field) shows galaxy cluster SMACS 0723 overflowing with detail. This was the deepest and sharpest infrared image of the distant universe to date. This slice of the vast universe covers a patch of sky approximately the size of a grain of sand held at arm’s length by someone on the ground.

Image
James Webb Space Telescope anniversary photo
Image attribution
NASA, ESA, CSA, STScI, Klaus Pontoppidan (STScI)

The first anniversary image from NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) displays star birth like never seen before, full of detailed, impressionistic texture. The subject is the Rho Ophiuchi cloud complex, the closest star-forming region to Earth. It is a relatively small, quiet stellar nursery, but you'd never know it from JWST's chaotic close-up. Jets bursting from young stars crisscross the image, impacting the surrounding interstellar gas and lighting up molecular hydrogen, shown in red. Some stars display the telltale shadow of a circumstellar disk, the makings of future planetary systems.

Image
The Southern Ring nebula captured by the James Webb Space Telescope.
Image attribution
NASA, ESA, CSA, and STScI

NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) revealed details of the Southern Ring planetary nebula that were previously hidden from astronomers. Planetary nebulae are the shells of gas and dust ejected from dying stars. JWST's powerful infrared view brings this nebula's second star into full view, along with exceptional structures created as the stars shape the gas and dust around them.

Image
Pillars of Creation captured by the James Webb Space Telescope
Image attribution
NASA, ESA, CSA, STScI; Joseph DePasquale (STScI), Anton M. Koekemoer (STScI), Alyssa Pagan (STScI)

The Pillars of Creation are set off in a kaleidoscope of color in NASA's James Webb Space Telescope’s near-infrared-light view. The pillars look like arches and spires rising out of a desert landscape, but are filled with semi-transparent gas and dust, and ever changing. This is a region where young stars are forming – or have barely burst from their dusty cocoons as they continue to form.

Image
Stephan's Quintet captured by the James Webb Space Telescope
Image attribution
NASA, ESA, CSA, and STScI

NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) revealed Stephan's Quintet in a new light. This enormous mosaic contains over 150 million pixels and is constructed from almost 1,000 separate image files. The information from JWST provides new insights into how galactic interactions may have driven galaxy evolution in the early universe.

Image
Carina Nebula captured by the James Webb Space Telescope
Image attribution
NASA, ESA, CSA, and STScI

Called the Cosmic Cliffs, this landscape of "mountains" and "valleys" speckled with glittering stars is actually the edge of a nearby, young, star-forming region called NGC 3324 in the Carina Nebula. Captured in infrared light by NASA's James Webb Space Telescope, this image reveals for the first time previously invisible areas of star birth. The tallest "peaks" in this image are about 7 light-years high. 

Image
Neptune's rings captured by the James Webb Space Telescope
Image attribution
NASA, ESA, CSA, STScI

NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) shows off its capabilities closer to home with its image of Neptune. Not only has JWST captured the clearest view of this distant planet’s rings in more than 30 years, but its cameras reveal the ice giant in a whole new light. Most striking in JWST's new image is the crisp view of the planet's rings – some of which have not been detected since NASA's Voyager 2 became the first spacecraft to observe Neptune during its flyby in 1989. 

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A family wearing 3D glasses and watching a film in the IMAX theater
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Learn About the James Webb Space Telescope
Webb Telescope Mission Overview text overlay above space image captured by the James Webb Space Telescope
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NASA

Activities & Educational Resources

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Build it Yourself telescope activity
Image attribution
NASA

Build It Yourself: Satellite!
Choose what science your satellite will be used to study, and then decide what wavelengths, instruments, and optics will help you learn the most about the science you've chosen. After you launch your satellite, you'll see what it looks like, and learn what real mission has data similar to the one you created. You'll discover a large range of astronomical missions, dating from the 1980s to today.

 

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Scope It Out Activity
Image attribution
NASA

Scope It Out!
The James Webb Space Telescope may be unusual in appearance - but it has a lot in common with simple tube-shaped telescopes. Scope It Out! includes an introduction to telescopes and two matching games. 

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NASA Webb Deployment Flipbook
Image attribution
NASA

Webb Deployment Flipbook 
For the James Webb Space Telescope to fit into a rocket, it had to be folded up. This 48-frame flipbook highlights how Webb deploys or unfolds like a transformer once in space. As you quickly flip through the frames, you can see an animation of how Webb deployed in space!

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James Webb Space Telescope coloring sheet
Image attribution
NASA/Ball Aerospace

Webb Coloring Activities
Grab your crayons, colored pencils, or paints and download one of NASA's coloring templates to start your masterpiece of the James Webb Space Telescope!

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NASA James Webb Space Telescope illustration
Image attribution
NASA GSFC/CIL/Adriana Manrique Gutierrez

For more educational resources, visit NASA's website

Image
Build it Yourself telescope activity
Image attribution
NASA

Build It Yourself: Satellite!
Choose what science your satellite will be used to study, and then decide what wavelengths, instruments, and optics will help you learn the most about the science you've chosen. After you launch your satellite, you'll see what it looks like, and learn what real mission has data similar to the one you created. You'll discover a large range of astronomical missions, dating from the 1980s to today.

 

Image
Scope It Out Activity
Image attribution
NASA

Scope It Out!
The James Webb Space Telescope may be unusual in appearance - but it has a lot in common with simple tube-shaped telescopes. Scope It Out! includes an introduction to telescopes and two matching games. 

Image
NASA Webb Deployment Flipbook
Image attribution
NASA

Webb Deployment Flipbook 
For the James Webb Space Telescope to fit into a rocket, it had to be folded up. This 48-frame flipbook highlights how Webb deploys or unfolds like a transformer once in space. As you quickly flip through the frames, you can see an animation of how Webb deployed in space!

Image
James Webb Space Telescope coloring sheet
Image attribution
NASA/Ball Aerospace

Webb Coloring Activities
Grab your crayons, colored pencils, or paints and download one of NASA's coloring templates to start your masterpiece of the James Webb Space Telescope!

Image
NASA James Webb Space Telescope illustration
Image attribution
NASA GSFC/CIL/Adriana Manrique Gutierrez

For more educational resources, visit NASA's website

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